China-Russia gas deal creates Arctic winners and losers

cryopolitics

2788563700_02c35d9875_o Photo: Vicki Watkins/Flickr

The $400 billion, 30-year China-Russia gas deal signed in Shanghai on May 21 has sparked a lot of excitement about hydrocarbons in the Russian Arctic and sub-Arctic. Under the agreement, which had been in the works for a decade, Gazprom will supply China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) with 38 billion cubic meters of gas annually beginning in 2018. The deal fulfills Russia’s goal, as outlined in its Energy Strategy to 2030 (in English), to increase exports to Asia. By 2030, the strategy envisions that eastern-bound exports of oil will constitute 22%-25% (as opposed to the current 6%), and gas 19-20% as opposed to the current 0%.* Much of this gas will be delivered through a new pipeline that Gazprom is constructing from the Siberian gas fields of Kovykta (Irkutsk) and Chayanda (Yakutsk) to the Chinese border. A couple of other pipelines will also need to be built, as this handy map from the Washington Post…

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Ukraine will not engage in dialogue with the DPR and the LPR

SLAVYANGRAD.org

Original: Colonel Cassad
Translated by Gleb Bazov / Edited by @GBabeuf

pressconference

The President of Ukraine, Petro Poroshenko told the the 8th Kiev Forum on Security Issues that Ukraine will not engage in dialogue with representatives of the self-proclaimed Donetsk and Lugansk republics (the “DPR” and the “LPR”, respectively). He stated, inter alia:

We must ensure fair elections. And we will conduct dialogue with the Donbass, but with a different Donbass, a Ukrainian one.”

The same position, but in even harsher terms, was expressed at the Forum by the Prime-Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk. He is prepared to talk to the representatives of the Republics “only once they are behind bars.” “By the way, we have enough empty cells,” he added.

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Purging the Purged: Solzhenitsyn, Ukraine, and the West

Nina Kouprianova

Alexander Solzhenitsyn is one of the best-known Soviet dissidents, so much so that he earned the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1970. His Gulag Archipelago, written in the 1950s-60s, and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich from 1962—both about the Stalin-era labor-camp system—are his most famous works outside of Russia. Yet after the collapse of the USSR, it became increasingly clear that much of his foreign support was not inspired by the Western ideal of ‘human rights’ or concern for average Russians, but served as a tool of geopolitics instead.

His statements about resurgent Russia, particularly in the last years before his death in 2008–well into the era of Putin’s leadership–did not suit those that would rather have the country in the permanently weak state of ‘freedom’ and ‘democracy’ of the 1990s, so that its resources could continue being plundered by domestic oligarchs and foreigners alike, while its culture–transformed into…

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Canada’s Ukrainian Obsession

SLAVYANGRAD.org

CanadaCanadian Defence Minister, Jason Kenney, announcing that Canadian troops will be sent to Ukraine. / by Adrian Wyld, The Canadian Press


Preamble : On the heels of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s fiasco in attempting to silence the music of a brilliant pianist Valentina Lisitsa for her outspoken position on the war in Ukraine, Lysiane Gagnon, a renowned Canadian journalist and a long-standing correspondent of the Montreal publication La Presse and the Globe and Mail, tackles yet another serious issue for Canada—whether or not to put boots on the ground in Ukraine. For Ms Gagnon, the answer is clear: “Stephen Harper’s Ukrainian obsession is a dangerous little game.” She concludes that it is Harper, not Putin who must get out of Ukraine. In Montreal, one of the centres of Western Ukrainian diaspora in Canada, this position is a bold one, notwithstanding the Québecers’ long-standing dissatisfaction with the Canadian Prime Minister. Do Ms Gagnon’s forthright condemnation of Canada’s meddling in Ukraine and the…

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Oles Buzina: His Open Letter to the US Ambassador in Kiev

SLAVYANGRAD.org

During the Maidan uprising, the now murdered journalist, historian and writer, Oles Buzina, wrote an open Letter to Geoffrey Pyatt, the Ambassador at the US Embassy in Kiev. It was published January 23, 2014, one month before the coup d’état on Buzina’s Blog on the Ukrainian news site segodnya.ua

Edited by @GBabeuf

Oles Busina: His Open Letter to the US Ambassador in Kiev

Mr. Pyatt, I appeal to you as a recognised and well-known Ukrainian writer, who never asked for and never took any grants [money –ed.] from your country. This letter comes from my own initiative, there are no political parties or oligarchic groups behind it. However, I am sure my opinion coincides with the thoughts of many Ukrainian citizens whom you blatantly ignore.

The other day, when unrest on Maidan Square reached its peak, the media reported that a representative of the U.S. National Security Council, Kathleen Hayden, demanded…

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10 Reasons Ukraine is Dead

The Truth Speaker

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By Graham Phillips

Hard as it is to say, sad as it is for those of us who liked Ukraine, as I liked Ukraine – over 2 years living there pre-war, it was a country I was very fond of – but post-Euromaidan, Ukraine is dead. Here’s why –

1. If there’s no law, it’s not a country, it’s a failed state – the recent wave of killings of anyone perceived to be ‘anti-regime’ in Ukraine, accompanied by not only resounding failure to investigate, but actually official endorsement of those responsible – the fact that the police in Ukraine defer to terrorist group Pravy Sektor. Just the start of a long list. There’s no law whatsoever in post-Euromaidan Ukraine.

2. If there’s no democracy, it’s not a country. It’s a banana state. On February 22nd, 2014, Euromaidan kicked out not only a democratically-elected president, but a democratically-elected…

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Murder of Oles Buzina— a campaign of intimidation by NATO?

SLAVYANGRAD.org

Original: Убийство Бузины – акция устрашения НАТО
Translated by Valentina Lisitsa / Edited by @GBabeuf

Having considered some of the circumstances of the death of Oles Buzina, we are leaning towards the conclusion that his murder is one element in a bloody campaign unleashed by NATO with the aim of intimidating dissenters in Ukraine. Yet another victim of this campaign—Oleg Kalashnikov.

Judge for yourself:

The Ukrainian website “Mirotvorets” [The Peacekeeper] publishes personal information of “separatists”, “partisans of the Russian Universe” and other enemies of the Kiev regime. On April 13, 2015, a user named “404” published on this website all personal information on Oleg Kalashnikov:

https://psb4ukr.org/criminal/kalashnikov-oleg-ivanovich/   [Screenshot S1 – Translation see on bottom of page]

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